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Page title length for search engines

Posted by Mark Rogers on Apr 23, 2013 | 

SEO

Ever been wondered why there’s a lot of conflicting advice about longest page title allowed in search results pages (SERPS)? The short answer is different search engines have different limits and these limits keep changing. The current official guidelines, as of April 2013, are: W3C recommends a maximum of 64 characters for page titles. Bing recommends a title around 65 characters long. Yahoo used to recommend a maximum title length of 67 characters, but this advice is now obsolete since Bing now supplies Yahoo’s search results.

 

Search 101 - how search engines work - part 2

Posted by Mark Rogers on Mar 13, 2008 | 

SEO

In Part 1 we covered how a search engine crawler visits web pages. In this part we're going to investigate how words on web pages are indexed. You'll recall the three phases of search engines: Crawling (or spidering) the web, finding pages people want to search Indexing words on web pages Searching the index (i.e. the bit that happens when you type a search into Google) A search engine index works very like the way the index in book works: in a book each word in the index lists page numbers the word appears on; in a search index each word has a list of pages the word appears on.

 

Search 101 - how search engines work - part 1

Posted by Mark Rogers on Jan 30, 2008 | 

SEO

Having some background on how search engines work is very useful when you're trying to optimize your site. We hope we've a bit of perspective on this, having spent the best part of a decade implementing search engines and web crawlers. How do words on a web page end up searchable? This happens in three phases: Crawling (or spidering) the web, finding pages people want to search Indexing words on web pages Searching the index (i.

 

Google hidden text penalties

Posted by Mark Rogers on Oct 16, 2007 | 

SEO

Google wants sites in its index, but it doesn't want sites that use sneaky techniques to increase their rankings. If Google detects a site using these techniques, they penalize the site's ranking (or remove it altogether). Google has a set of freely available guidelines on the sort of techniques they frown on, but it's often difficult to know when you're breaking them - especially if you're not the one writing the site code.